My Fascinations

Design-love, Nature-worship, Animism, Mysticism, Arches, Archaeology, Gnosticism

‘Exceptional’ gold medallion goes on display at Israel Museum

Reblogged from archaeologicalnews

archaeologicalnews:

A huge gold medallion and a trove of gold pieces went on display at the Israel Museum for the first time since their discovery last year at the base of the Temple Mount, the museum announced Monday.

The find, made last year by a Hebrew University team led by Professor Eilat Mazar near the…

Reblogged from thedruidsteaparty

thedruidsteaparty:

Here is my gorgeous oak leaf pendent from OrnamentalGlass Etsyshop

I cannot tell you how beautiful this is when it catches the light, it changes from gold to blue to red. 

ornamentalglass:

SpiderMan fan art RainbowLightcaster by Richard Elvis    Etsy

Reblogged from ornamentalglass

ornamentalglass:

SpiderMan fan art RainbowLightcaster by Richard Elvis    Etsy

ornamentalglass:

Crystallized dichroic glass Willow leaf earrings.  The leaves will turn from green to copper to gold as your viewing angle changes.  When they are back lit they are blue, purple, and magenta.  By Richard Elvis     Etsy

Reblogged from ornamentalglass

ornamentalglass:

Crystallized dichroic glass Willow leaf earrings.  The leaves will turn from green to copper to gold as your viewing angle changes.  When they are back lit they are blue, purple, and magenta.  By Richard Elvis     Etsy

Reblogged from ornamentalglass

ornamentalglass:

With the Day of the Dead, Dia de Los muertos, a major festival here in New Mexico coming up the day after Halloween we it was a good time to show some of our wares.  Richard and Marie Etsy

vertigo1871:

Mari, Upper Mesopotamia, Praying queen, 2470 b.C.

Reblogged from chorjavon

vertigo1871:

Mari, Upper Mesopotamia, Praying queen, 2470 b.C.

the-paintrist:

colourthysoul:

Thomas Moran - The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone

Thomas Moran's vision of the Western landscape was critical to the creation of Yellowstone National Park. In 1871 Dr. Ferdinand Hayden, director of the United States Geological Survey, invited Moran, at the request of American financier Jay Cooke, to join Hayden and his expedition team into the unknown Yellowstone region. Hayden was just about to embark on his arduous journey when he received a letter from Cooke presenting Moran as “an artist of Philadelphia of rare genius”. Funded by Cooke (the director of the Northern Pacific Railroad), and Scribner’s Monthly, a new illustrated magazine, Moran agreed to join the survey team of the Hayden Geological Survey of 1871 in their exploration of the Yellowstone region.
During forty days in the wilderness area, Moran visually documented over 30 different sites and produced a diary of the expedition’s progress and daily activities. His sketches, along with photographs produced by survey member William Henry Jackson, captured the nation’s attention and helped inspire Congress to establish the Yellowstone region as the first national park in 1872. Moran’s paintings along with Jackson’s photographs revealed the scale and splendor of the beautiful Yellowstone region more than written or oral descriptions, persuading President Grant and the US Congress that Yellowstone was to be preserved. Moran’s impact on Yellowstone was great, but Yellowstone had a significant influence on the artist, too. His first national recognition as an artist, as well as his first large financial success resulted from his connection with Yellowstone. He even adopted a new signature: T-Y-M, Thomas “Yellowstone” Moran.
Just one year after his introduction to the area, Moran captured the imagination of the American public with his first enormous painting of a far-western natural wonder, The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, which the government purchased in 1872 for $10,000. For the next two decades, he published his work in various periodicals and created hundreds of large paintings. Several of these, including two versions of The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone (1893–1901 and 1872) and Chasm of the Colorado (1873–74) are now on view at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

Reblogged from ybb55

the-paintrist:

colourthysoul:

Thomas Moran - The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone

Thomas Moran's vision of the Western landscape was critical to the creation of Yellowstone National Park. In 1871 Dr. Ferdinand Hayden, director of the United States Geological Survey, invited Moran, at the request of American financier Jay Cooke, to join Hayden and his expedition team into the unknown Yellowstone region. Hayden was just about to embark on his arduous journey when he received a letter from Cooke presenting Moran as “an artist of Philadelphia of rare genius”. Funded by Cooke (the director of the Northern Pacific Railroad), and Scribner’s Monthly, a new illustrated magazine, Moran agreed to join the survey team of the Hayden Geological Survey of 1871 in their exploration of the Yellowstone region.

During forty days in the wilderness area, Moran visually documented over 30 different sites and produced a diary of the expedition’s progress and daily activities. His sketches, along with photographs produced by survey member William Henry Jackson, captured the nation’s attention and helped inspire Congress to establish the Yellowstone region as the first national park in 1872. Moran’s paintings along with Jackson’s photographs revealed the scale and splendor of the beautiful Yellowstone region more than written or oral descriptions, persuading President Grant and the US Congress that Yellowstone was to be preserved. Moran’s impact on Yellowstone was great, but Yellowstone had a significant influence on the artist, too. His first national recognition as an artist, as well as his first large financial success resulted from his connection with Yellowstone. He even adopted a new signature: T-Y-M, Thomas “Yellowstone” Moran.

Just one year after his introduction to the area, Moran captured the imagination of the American public with his first enormous painting of a far-western natural wonder, The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone, which the government purchased in 1872 for $10,000. For the next two decades, he published his work in various periodicals and created hundreds of large paintings. Several of these, including two versions of The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone (1893–1901 and 1872) and Chasm of the Colorado (1873–74) are now on view at the Smithsonian American Art Museum.

art-centric:

Emil Nolde - Blue Sky and Sunflowers

Reblogged from ybb55

art-centric:

Emil Nolde - Blue Sky and Sunflowers

thecrankyprofessor:

venusmilk:

František Kupka. Prometheus. (1909)
(source)


I’m starting Hesiod’s Theogony today in class.

Reblogged from thecrankyprofessor

thecrankyprofessor:

venusmilk:

František Kupka. Prometheus. (1909)

(source)

I’m starting Hesiod’s Theogony today in class.

lilithsplace:

'The Phoenix', c. 1952 - Ben Shahn (1898–1969) 

Reblogged from parkstepp

lilithsplace:

'The Phoenix', c. 1952 - Ben Shahn (1898–1969)